May 11, 1919. “She [Isadora Duncan] was much dolled up but looks her age. Was amused at her comments on the lack of appreciation of art in America and the tale she spun to me about how badly she had been treated.”

May 11, 1919 to Mother.

Had a call Thursday from Isadora Duncan but about the very business matter of her school[1] which we have at this moment under requisition and are using it as a part of the Educational Dept., A.E.F. Now that the war is over she wants to get it back and commence her dancing school again. I had had several conversations with her lawyer about it. Finally she decided she’d come around herself and went to all the agony of getting a Major who is with the Peace Commission to come to see me and make an appointment for her with me—as if I was that hard to see. She was much dolled up but looks her age. Was amused at her comments on the lack of appreciation of art in America and the tale she spun to me about how badly she had been treated. Don’t know what effect she thought she’d have but she seemed rather peeved when I told her that the army would be through with her place in June and we could return it to her then but that I had no power to do so before its present use was finished. Had an interesting side light on it Saturday night when dancing with an English girl whom I had seen at another dance on Wednesday. She spoke of having met Isadora on Thursday and how peeved she was at Americans in general and in particular with and American Captain who was very hard and unsympathetic, who appeared to have never heard of her and who refused to give her her school. My English friend had met her the same day as my interview with her and was greatly amused when she found that I was the Captain in question. She said if she had known that the Captain she had danced with the night before was the same one Isadora was swearing at, she would have poked her up and got more information as to her bad opinion of me.

Speaking of interesting people of a different kind, was out at the St. Cloud Club for golf late one afternoon this week and had quite a good look at Lloyd George[2] who was playing there at the same time. Saw him on the course and then later in the club house. He surely looks young for his position and responsibility and as if he had many years of activity yet to come.

Have been today down to Fontainebleau and went through the palace there this afternoon, seeing the suites of Napoleon, Marie Antoinette and the other royal personages who lived there at one time and another. …. It was the favorite spring and summer palace of the kings of France and can well see why after seeing it for now in May it is wonderfully beautiful. The rooms and furniture in the Palace are beautiful but think Napoleon would have appreciated a modern bathtub instead of the ancient zinc proposition he had.

With reference to sending money to Frank, made an allotment of $30 a month to him to be effective June 1st but don’t know if notification will reach Washington in time for the first of next month or not. Had the intention of allotting $50 a month and beginning earlier but the cost of living has gone up by such leaps and bounds since the armistice that my pay as a captain now goes very little further than that of a 2nd. Lt. last summer. Just at the time I got my captaincy had to buy a new uniform and overcoat and that got my surplus pay for two months. And so it goes—any shoes fit to wear are $20 a pair and everything else is in proportion. Compared to most of the officers here I live a very quiet and inexpensive sort of life but the pay of a Captain, on half of which I could have lived well in Spartanburg, leaves me pinched here all the time. However, [Frank] will begin to receive the $30 a month certainly by July 1st and wish I could have begun before.

Am going tonight to a Mothers Day reception given by the Association of French Homes for American Officers and shall be thinking of you there. This is not as good a letter as I should have liked to write you on Mothers Day but it’s my Mothers Day letter to you.

[1] Duncan (1877-1927) owned two apartments at 5, rue Danton in the heart of the Latin Quarter; she lived in one and used the other as her school. It’s not clear whether the AEF rented one or both.

[2] David Lloyd George (1863-1945) was Prime Minister of England, representing his country at the Paris Peace Conference at Versailles.

May 6, 1919. To Mabel. “What is the news about John’s trying to fly over here?”

May 6, 1919 to Mabel.

“Last week we had a day off for the first of May. You probably saw in the papers that everybody stopped work that day. There were no subways, street cars or taxis. All restaurants were closed and most hotel labor quit. I was down town that morning to see Sam Nicholls[1] who was here with the Committee on Military Affairs and Paris looked like a city of the dead. I went down in an army car and ours, English and French army cars were about the only things stirring. ….

“We cut down our crowd in the apartment last week, now being five in one apartment instead of ten in two but are keeping the same good cook. You know on all French leases there is made up when you go in an “état des lieux” or detailed statement of the condition of the premises and furniture and when you leave this is checked up with the actual condition of the place and the lessee pays the difference.

“When we got out of this one apartment I had the job of checking over these damages with the “gerante,” as the manager of the apartment house is known, and the particularity with which she went into everything was interesting and amusing.

“What is the news about John’s trying to fly over here?  Have been interested in the news about our navy’s try at this especially as John thinks he might get over in the bunch. Surely hope he will be one of the crowd as believe they will succeed and would like very much to see him here.”

[1] South Carolina District 4 Congressman whom Monty knows from living and working in the District.

April 28, 2019. “Was at the opera again last Wednesday night with M. Pellerin. The opera was ‘Castor and Pollux’ which didn’t interest me a lot but the scene in the house was most interesting as it was a gala night in honor of Admiral Beatty and the visiting officers of the British fleet….”

April 28, 1919 to Mother.

Monty reports a cold wave and “a fine little snowstorm.”

“Attended the championship boxing matches of the AEF Saturday night.”  He saw the Crown Prince of Belgium whom he describes as “a rather shy looking youngster of 19,” not as enthralled with the boxing as his companions General Pershing and the general’s Belgian military counterpart.

“Everyone is of course talking about Wilson’s note about Fiume[1] and no one knows what the outcome will be.”  He expects they’ll know the answer by the time his letter gets to them.

Monty’s outings, especially the opera, seem more and more to be blunt observation of his surrounding, especially the notable people. “Was at the opera again last Wednesday night with M. Pellerin. The opera was ‘Castor and Pollux’ which didn’t interest me a lot but the scene in the house was most interesting as it was a gala night in honor of Admiral Beatty and the visiting officers of the British fleet and the costumes and uniforms in the circle of boxes was brilliant. Had quite a good look at Admiral Beatty who appears very young for his position and responsibility.”[2]

 

[1] Wilson contemplated an independent state and a possible League of Nations headquarters; his intent was to remove it as a bone of contention between Italy and the newly formed Yugoslavia. Fiume was an independent state in 1920 and remained so until 1924 when it was annexed by Italy.

[2] Admiral David Beatty was 48 at the time, having reached the rank of Admiral in 1916 when he became commander in chief of the Grand Fleet. He accepted the surrender of the German navy in November 1918; he was promoted to Admiral of the Fleet on May 1, 1919, several days after Monty’s sighting. He was apparently the youngest Admiral since Horatio Nelson who died at Trafalgar at the age of 47.

April 21, 1919.”Today is, being Easter Monday, a national holiday in France and I’ve been able to do little business as a consequence for most of my work is with French people.”

April 21, 1919 to Mother.

Received your letter of April 2nd with clippings today and enjoyed all the news. Kate seems to be quite “het up” on the suffrage question from all accounts. Rather imagine that Frank, while agreeing with her in principle, would probably enjoy life more if she paid a little less attention to suffrage and more to her husband and house. Which reminds me of a conversation that I had on Saturday with a married lady of mature years at M. Pellerin’s usual luncheon on the subject of the effect on women of the present generation of too much participation in sports and outside matters. She represented the conservative French point of view on the matter saying that she thought the “jeunes filles” of today had lost in grace through too much interest in matters outside their homes and that the young married women were no more the gracious mistresses of their homes that they had been formerly. Needless to say she was not at all in sympathy with suffrage. She is also of the type which is unable to comprehend how our American girls can go out everywhere unchaperoned with young men. That is a topic on which I’ve had many discussions with my French friends and they no more understand our point of view on this than we do theirs with regard to keeping girls very closely and the parents marrying them off without reference or not to whether they love each other.

Nothing of great interest with me this last week. Continue pretty busy and don’t see much likelihood of getting away from my present work before the fall. The A.E.F. is of course going home very fast but our service will have the job of cleaning up claims after they’ve gone and suppose we reserve officers will be held in this work until sufficient regular officers can be broken in on it. All of the officers now on duty with me are quite willing to stay in France several months longer except one and he is the only regular army officer in the bunch and therefore has the least chance of getting home early.

Today is, being Easter Monday, a national holiday in France and I’ve been able to do little business as a consequence for most of my work is with French people. It’s a beautiful spring day and think now the spring has come to stay. My office looks out over the Place de l’Etoile and the Arch de Triomphe and it’s all wonderfully pretty now with all the trees in their first spring dress.

Suppose Gov. Manning must now be in Paris but have no idea how to get in touch with him. Hope however to get hold of him some was and get around to see him and Mrs. Manning. The Congressional Committee on Military Affairs is now touring France and are due to be here next Sunday and Bert France and I want to see Sam Nicholls while here.

Love to all,

Carl

April 14, 1919. To Mabel. “My old friend, M. Pellerin, continues to be as nice as ever. Was in his box at the opera last Wednesday night to see ‘Samson & Delilah’ and rather enjoyed it.”

April 14, 1919 Letter to Mabel.

My dear Mabel,

Your letter of March 22nd reached me several days ago and enjoyed all of your home news very much. Sorry Mr. Herring is so much trouble but think it will be a good idea to get rid of him and lease the farm direct. That will certainly be much less trouble to you and mother.

A good many of my American friends here are leaving all at once this week, mostly on the Leviathan[1] which makes me a little homesick as among them are several of my best friends. The Sharpes are going, the Crasley [?] girls—daughters of the Asst. Secy. of the Treasury, the daughter of my friend Madame Borel is also going with her American officer husband and then also a Captain & his wife from Chicago, whom I’ve known awfully well ever since being in Paris, are also going back. However, still have enough friends here to make life pleasant. My old friend, M. Pellerin, continues to be as nice as ever. Was in his box at the opera last Wednesday night to see “Samson & Delilah” and rather enjoyed it. I might develop a taste for the opera after taking it in broken doses but doubt that I’ll ever become a real devotee.

Edward Mullins was in town the early part of last week on his way to rejoin the 42nd Division and go home with them. Had him over to lunch and enjoyed talking over happenings [three words—with both sun] in the A.E.F. Guess he as well as the other members of the “Rainbow Division” will be in Marion by the last of next month.

Today is a real April day, raining a while and then the sun once in a while. These spring rains have had a wonderful influence on the trees and grass and Paris is beginning to take on its coat of green. It’s the coming of the best season here—wish you could see it as you’d surely enjoy Paris any time but particularly in May & June. Shall be much interested in seeing Paris during these months and in peace time as last year it was a sad city with the Bosche so close and the Gothas coming over every fair night.

No other news at this time.

Love to all,

Carl

[1] Ironically a German built luxury cruise ship (SS Vaterland) seized by the United States government and put in service as a troopship. Nearly 1000 feet long, the ship was configured to carry 14,000 troops.

April7, 1919. “I am afraid our mess is going to break up and I’ll have to go back to hotel life for which don’t care at all. Our rent is now just 80 per cent higher than when we took the apartment….”

[newly discovered letter (this and next three)]

April 7, 1919 to Mother.

We’ve had a week of fine spring weather and everybody is feeling much better after the rotten weather all through March. The trees are coming out fast and in a week or two more [?] Paris will have arrived at it’s most beautiful time of year—May and June here make one forget the rotten weather of the winter.

Nothing of particular interest with me except I am afraid our mess is going to break up and I’ll have to go back to hotel life for which don’t care at all. Our rent is now just 80 per cent higher than when we took the apartment and with the added cost of living it’s difficult to get new officers to fill new vacancies because the tenure of most of us on any job over here now is more or less uncertain and a man doesn’t like to tie himself up with the responsibilities of an apartment. However, we may decide to give up one of our two apartments and keep going in the other one with only half the number.

Now that the weather is getting fine expect in the next week or two to take an auto trip up to the Belgian border and [covering/camaing?] Soissons and some of the other parts of the old front which I haven’t seen. My office has some [few???] claims and requisitions up that way to clear up and have been waiting a little until the weather should be decent enough to go.

See from the morning paper that the House Committee on Military Affairs is coming over on an investigation trip so guess I’ll see Sam Nicholls among them.

Haven’t heard anything more of Gov. Manning so guess he hasn’t yet reached Paris.

Hope you are all well

Love to all,

Carl

[on the back in his mother’s hand]  Think you had seen this letter but Bell had not. Mother.

[full transcription underway]

March 30, 1919. “Had dinner at the Embassy Thursday night…. “

March 30,1919 to Mother.

Handwritten. “never seem to get time during office hours so guess you’ll have to try my handwriting for a change.”

“I put on my third service stripe this week for 18 months in France and it looks as if I’ll have still another before I get back across the water.”

He decries “rotten weather” which must contrast still with his stint along the “Riviera a month ago” and, he writes, “it’s getting a bit tiresome.”  Much like last winter, he anticipates spring, “and then it is really pleasant to be in Paris when the nice weather arrives.”  He wants to get down to Fontainebleau. “We don’t work now on Saturday afternoons and Sundays so that gives one a little more chance to get around.”

“Had lunch as usual on Saturday with my old friend M. Pellerin and took him afterwards to the [AEF championship football] game to show him how American Football looked—he took quite an interest in it and I think enjoyed it thoroughly.”

“Had dinner at the Embassy Thursday night…. The Sharpes are leaving the 12th of this month and am sorry to see them go as have had some very pleasant times at the Embassy this winter.”

“Bert France had a letter full of Spartanburg news this week. …. Hope also to see Governor Manning when he gets here.”

[full transcription underway]

March 16, 1919. To Mabel. “The old caretaker [Reims Cathedral] told us that never a shell exploded inside, all having exploded on contact or having been ‘duds.'”

March 16, 1919.

“Have just had a long walk this P.M. down along the Seine and back up the Champs Elysee at my office…. There is quite a crowd on the Champs Elysee this afternoon as it is a beautiful Sunday but it’s not often that I see it these days as am usually at St. Cloud getting better exercise at golf. However, today it’s rather cold and cloudy so didn’t go out; therefore this walk in the course of which I saw the President for the first time since his return. The Place des Etats-Units [sic], where his new abode is situated, is just a two or three minute walk from our apartment and I often hit through there going towards the river. Was just turning into it when his car came rolling by with a big army Cadillac just behind and its usual load of secret service men. Mrs. Wilson was with him as usual when he goes out.

“Speaking of walking, now that the weather is getting decent again, I usually leave the office in time before lunch to take a turn down through the Avenue du Bois de Boulougne on the way to the apartment and have a look at the noontime parade as well as getting a breath of air. It’s quite the thing among fashionable people to stroll there from about 11:30 to 12:30 every fine day and it’s quite amusing to see the varied costumes, dogs, etc., for you know they don’t believe in going out without their dogs.”

He turns then to a trip he believes Mabel will appreciate perhaps more than his Mother, one which gives a rather clear picture of the war and it’s effects:

Had a trip on Friday which I know you would have enjoyed, going to Chateau-Thierry, La Fere-en-Tardenois, Fismes, Rheims, Epernay, and back through Chateau-Thierry and Meaux to Paris, a total run of about 190 miles, all in one day. Had some claims to investigate at Chateau-Thierry and a lease to see about at La Fere so ran on to Rheims while that close to have a good look at the cathedral. It is still capable of restoration in spite of the number of shells which hit it but it will be a long job. The old caretaker told us that never a shell exploded inside, all having exploded on contact or having been “duds.”  Several of the duds have been picked out of the walls or floor and are now on exhibition. The city of Rheims is very badly damaged by shell fire, there being very few houses I saw which had not been hit at least once, and it’s not such a small town either, having a population of 100,000 before the war. It is most interesting to see all of this country, the shell holes and trenches, empty shell cases and other salvage being still on the ground. Our own troops fought through a lot of this country and in passing you see the graveyards fairly often where the Graves Registration Service has assembled our dead.

This was my second time up in that country, having been through part of it in mid-September but didn’t get as far north the other time, turning back south of Epernay instead of going on towards Rheims. The villages that were badly shot up are still pretty well deserted but guess the people will be getting back to their homes now that the milder weather is coming on.

“Went down to the Gymnase last night to see ‘Le Secret’ by [Henri] Bernstein…  have never yet been over to the Odeon—which is a very famous old theater in the Latin Quarter—but hope to drift over there some night soon.”

Transcribed Letter

[American Expeditionary Forces letterhead]

 

Hq.Dist.of Paris, A.P.O.702

March 16th, 1919.

 

Dear Mabel: –

Your letter of Feb. 24th reached me yesterday and am mighty glad to hear that Mother is still improving. Hope you are staying at St. Augustine until she is in thoroughly good shape again. Was interested in your saying that Genevieve Wilcox is coming over and hope to see her when she is in Paris.

Have just had a long walk this P.M. down along the Seine and back up the Champs Elysee to my office, our office building being, as believe I’ve written before, directly on the Place de l’Etoile and the Arch de Triomphe. There is quite a crowd on the Champs Elysee this afternoon as it is a beautiful Sunday but it’s not often that I see it these days as am usually at St. Cloud getting better exercise at golf. However, today it’s rather cold and cloudy so didn’t go out; therefore this walk in the course of which I saw the President for the first time since his return. The Place des Etats-Units [sic], where his new abode is situated, is just a two or three minute walk from our apartment and I often hit through there going towards the river. Was just turning into it when his car came rolling by with a big army Cadillac just behind and its usual load of secret service men. Mrs. Wilson was with him as usual when he goes out.

Speaking of walking, now that the weather is getting decent again, I usually leave the office in time before lunch to take a turn down through the Avenue du Bois de Boulougne on the way to the apartment and have a look at the noontime parade as well as getting a breath of air. It’s quite the thing among fashionable people to stroll there from about 11:30 to 12:30 every fine day and it’s quite amusing to see the varied costumes, dogs, etc., for you know they don’t believe in going out without their dogs.

Had a trip on Friday which I know you would have enjoyed, going to Chateau-Thierry, La Fere-en-Tardenois, Fismes, Rheims, Epernay, and back through Chateau-Thierry and Meaux to Paris, a total run of about 190 miles, all in one day. Had some claims to investigate at Chateau-Thierry and a lease to see about at La Fere so ran on to Rheims while that close to have a good look at the cathedral. It is still capable of restoration in spite of the number of shells which hit it but it will be a long job. The old caretaker told us that never a shell exploded inside, all having exploded on contact or having been “duds.”  Several of the duds have been picked out of the walls or floor and are now on exhibition. The city of Rheims is very badly damaged by shell fire, there being very few houses I saw which had not been hit at least once, and it’s not such a small town either, having a population of 100,000 before the war. It is most interesting to see all of this country, the shell holes and trenches, empty shell cases and other salvage being still on the ground. Our own troops fought through a lot of this country and in passing you see the graveyards fairly often where the Graves Registration Service has assembled our dead.

This was my second time up in that country, having been through part of it in mid-September but didn’t get as far north the other time, turning back south of Epernay instead of going on towards Rheims. The villages that were badly shot up are still pretty well deserted but guess the people will be getting back to their homes now that the milder weather is coming on.

Not much other news with me this week. Went down to the Gymnase last night to see “Le Secret” by [Henri] Bernstein and enjoyed it thoroughly as it was awfully well acted, as, for that matter, are all of the French plays one sees.  Have never yet been over to the Odeon—which is a very famous old theater in the Latin Quarter—but hope to drift over there some night soon.”

Hoping this will find you and Mother both at home and well rested,

Love to all,

Carl [signed]

 

Thomas C. Montgomery [signed]

Captain, A.S.C.

 

February 15, 1919. “Guess I won’t see any of this spring in S.C. but hope to be there for the next one.”

February 15, 1919 to Mother

“Received your letter from St Augustine…glad to know you finally got down there. Know you will enjoy it and hope it will improve your rheumatism a lot.”

“Am finally getting away myself tomorrow,” though his plan has changed a bit. He will be “going partly on business partially on leave.  “We had requisitioned a number of large hotels down there for hospitals and are now giving them up and settling the damages.”  He’ll do that for a week and then “loaf for a week in addition.”  He will spend his loafing week “at Cannes and play golf as understand about the best golf there is.”

His mother has enclosed clippings on the inauguration of South Carolina’s new governor Robert Cooper but Monty is impressed with the new governor’s marriage to Dorcas Calmes. “Didn’t know of it before and was glad to know of her rise in the world though it did seem a bit funny to think of her as ‘the first lady of South Carolina.’”

He writes:  “Mr. Sharpe’s resignation came out here this morning. Had known of it since December as his daughter told me about it then and will be sorry to see them go as have come to know this eldest daughter and son fairly well and have had some very pleasant times at the Embassy.

“Speaking of Ambassadors, had quite a talk with Lord Derby’s daughter yesterday afternoon at a tea. She is typically English, not good looking but very pleasant.”

He now begins the long countdown:  “Guess I won’t see any of this spring in S.C. but hope to be there for the next one.”

February 3, 1919. “I’ve been thinking of how pleasant is a South Carolina winter compared to this damp cold.”

February 3, 1919 to Mother.

“I’ve been thinking of how pleasant is a South Carolina winter compared to this damp cold.” This presages his expectation for a leave, which has now expanded from one week to two weeks and he’s looking forward to traveling to the south of France. “I’m planning to play golf most of the time as am badly in need of outdoor exercise. …expect to spend most of my time very quietly at Cannes which is said not to be so full of Americans as the other places.” He’s anticipating the arrival for duty of Lieutenant Bert France “to get him broken in before I leave.” He explains the complexity of what he is doing and why there is so much specialization. Aside from the continual coming and going of personnel, he feels he is now short handed, “having just released one to the peace conference”:

Have another who spends most of his time on the road in the districts north of Paris settling up claims where our divisions were last summer. And then have another Captain and 2 Lieuts. who do nothing but automobile accident investigation and settlement of these claims.

He refers his mother to the January 4, 1919 issue of The Saturday Evening Post where Isaac F. Marcosson has written in detail about the Service of Supply, American Expeditionary Forces operations. Though Monty is not mentioned in the article, “I know personally a great many of the officers of whom he speaks.”

He describes a “quiet week socially compared with the way things have been going lately” which consisted of “one mighty good dance on Monday night at the home of the Baron de Leonino, the wife of said Baron being one of the Rothschilds[1], and their home is some little cottage to call home. Think it is the most beautiful place I have been in Paris, not excluding the villa Murat[2] where the President is staying. As usual at these dances, I found people of any number of nationalities, this time meeting a couple of Rumanian girls who surely could dance.”

[1] Two possibilities—both problematic—David Leonino (d 1911) marries Jeanne Sophie Henriette Rothschild and Emmanuel Leonino marries Bertha Juliette (d. 1906). In each case only one spouse is surviving in 1919. Monty’s identification leaves it unclear as to which Rothschild is intended though circumstantial information suggests it is the latter. Still need to locate the “little cottage” which may have been at 7, Rue Euler, since replaced by a commercial building.

[2] Hôtel du Prince Murat, 28 rue de Monceau, where Woodrow Wilson resided during his stay in Paris, 1918-1919.

 

Transcribed letter

[Letterhead: AMERICAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCES]

Hq. District of Paris

A.P.O 702, A.E.F.

[no date; envelope February 3, 1919]

Dear Mother:-

Your letter of Jan. 5th reached me during the week and was much enjoyed as usual. Hope you and Mabel are both in Florida by this time as you both surely deserve a rest in a warmer climate. It has been very cold here for the past two weeks after a mild winter up to that time and I’ve been thinking of how pleasant is a South Carolina winter compared to this damp cold. Am hoping to get away myself in the next week or two for a leave down on the Riviera. A new travel order is just out giving 14 days instead of the seven as heretofore though the 14 includes time of travel. However, it takes only a day each way to get down to Cannes or Nice so that gives me twelve days there and I’m planning to play golf most of the time as am badly in need of outdoor exercise. Shall probably run over to Monte Carlo and Menton for a day or two but expect to spend most of my time very quietly at Cannes which is said not to be so full of Americans as the other places and also more quiet. When I went down before stayed at Nice and I only passed through Cannes but remember well how beautiful it was. Don’t know exactly what day I’ll get away as I’m waiting on Burton France to report for duty with me and to get him broken in before I leave. Have one Lieut. who is rather familiar with the work, having been with me nearly three months but just released one to the Peace Conference so it leaves me short for the moment. Have another who spends most of his time on the road in the districts north of Paris settling up claims where our divisions were last summer. And then have another Captain and 2 Lieuts. who do nothing but automobile accident investigation and settlement of these claims. By the way there is in the Sat. Evening Post of Jan. 4th a write up of the R.R. & C. in connection with several other services of the “S.O.S.” A.E.F. which you may find interesting[1] if you have not yet read it. As heretofore explained to you, my job is known as Section Officer for the District of Paris which places me on the staff of the Commanding General of this District but my nearest boss in R.R.&C. work is the Director of the Service at Hq. S.O.S. Have been much interested in this series of articles by Marcosson in the Post on the S.O.S. as I know personally a great many of the officers of whom he speaks.

Had a more or less of a quiet week socially compared with the way things have been going lately but went to one mighty good dance on Monday night at the home of the Baron de Leonino, the wife of said Baron being one of the Rothschilds[2], and their home is some little cottage to call home. Think it is the most beautiful place I have been in Paris, not excluding the villa Murat[3] where the President is staying. As usual at these dances, I found people of any number of nationalities, this time meeting a couple of Rumanian girls who surely could dance. Sorry John couldn’t take in some of these dances as he would get a lot of enjoyment out of them.

As to what Mr. Wilcox had to say about studying international law, I don’t know so much about the advisability of that but am keeping my eye open for opportunities though haven’t yet much idea what will develop. Think there is going to be much American business with France and I might find something desirable with an American concern over here or vice versa.

Sorry to hear your rheumatism continues to trouble you. Know the taking out of your tonsils will be very painful but, if it will do away with your rheumatism, think it would be well worth while.

Love to all,

[signed] Carl

[signed] Thomas C. Montgomery

Capt. A.S.C.

 

 

[1] He refers his mother to the January 4, 1919 issue of The Saturday Evening Post where Isaac F. Marcosson has written in detail about the Service of Supply, American Expeditionary Forces operations. Though Monty is not mentioned in the article, “I know personally a great many of the officers of whom he speaks.”

[2] Two possibilities—both problematic—David Leonino (d 1911) marries Jeanne Sophie Henriette Rothschild and Emmanuel Leonino marries Bertha Juliette (d. 1906). In each case only one spouse is surviving in 1919. Monty’s identification leaves it unclear as to which Rothschild is intended though circumstantial information suggests it is the latter. Still need to locate the “little cottage” which may have been at 7, Rue Euler, since replaced by a commercial building.

[3] Hôtel du Prince Murat, 28 rue de Monceau, where Woodrow Wilson resided during his stay in Paris, 1918-1919.