September 10, 1918 to Mother.

In addition to his letter from home, he has received one from Miss Mary Getry, his ideal for a “steno.” That letter reports on Mr. Bomar’s[1] “race for Congress—am wondering how he came out in it…. Hope he put it over Sam Nicholls.”

He’s also been following the “new draft bill.[2] …have wondered how it will affect Frank and Horace[3]—suppose they won’t know for some time.”

Everyone here—and I suppose in the States too—continues to smile over the way Foch has been putting it over on the Bosche. Talking to a Frenchman in the Metro (as the subway is known here) the other night about the latest communiqué he remarked “Oh, Monsieur, the Communiqués are always pleasant reading now—what a difference from the spring.” And I think that difference will be permanent.

He has subscribed to the “Stars and Stripes” for his mother.

His work never ceases to be “interesting and busy” and now he has “a new Lieutenant as assistant” and thinks he will get another one though “the work has been gaining so rapidly with the increase of the A.E.F. that I fear it doesn’t mean much of a let up for me. However, with two assistants I ought to be able to get away for a 7 day leave….”

“Just a year ago today since I sailed out of New York and a year full of many interesting things. Hope things may so come out that I can be in talking distance of you instead of having to write a year from now.”

[1] Horace Bomar was partner in the Law Firm Monty had started with in 1914? Bomar lost the Congressional race to incumbent Sam Nicholls who represented South Carolina’s 4th District from 1915 to 1921.

[2] Need clarification on this.

[3] Monty’s brothers in law. Frank is married to Kate; Horace to Bell.

 

Transcribed Letter

September 10, 1918 to Mother.

Dear mother –

Your letter of Aug. 9th reached me last week just after I had written you. Also had one from Miss Marie Gentry telling me about Mr. Bomar’s[1] “race for Congress. Am wondering how he came out in it, election time being now over. Hope he put it over Sam Nicholl’s.

Guess you must have had some awfully hot weather during August from your letter and what some of the other fellows have heard from home. Here there wasn’t a day we’d call hot in South Carolina – in fact there were very few nights I didn’t have a blanket over me.

Notice from the papers that the new draft bill[2] has gone into effect and have wondered how it will affect Frank and Horace[3]—suppose they won’t know for some time.”

Everyone here—and I suppose in the States too—continues to smile over the way Foch has been putting it over on the Bosche. Talking to a Frenchman in the Metro (as the subway is known here) the other night about the latest communiqué he remarked “Oh, Monsieur, the Communiqués are always pleasant reading now—what a difference from the spring.” And I think that difference will be permanent.

Was up in the “Stars & Stripes office about a month ago and subscribed for it to be sent direct to you so you should have begun to receive it regularly by now. Thank you’ll find that much better as, although I buy it every week, I often forget to send it on to you. The captain in charge told me they were going to begin to publish an edition of it in the States being the same as this but two or three weeks later in date.

My work continues interesting and keeps me busy. Got a new lieutenant as assistant yesterday and expect another one soon but the work has been growing so rapidly with the increase at the A.E.F. that I fear it doesn’t mean much of a let up for me. However with two assistants I ought to be able to get away for a 7 day leave which I will surely come in nicely.

Just a year ago today since I sailed out of New York and a year full of many interesting things. Hope things may so come out that I can be in talking distance of you instead of having to write a year from now.

Love to all, Carl

[1] Horace Bomar was partner in the Law Firm Monty had started with in 1914? Bomar lost the Congressional race to incumbent Sam Nicholls who represented South Carolina’s 4th District from 1915 to 1921.

[2] Need clarification on this.

[3] Monty’s brothers in law. Frank is married to Kate; Horace to Bell.

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