May 25, 1918. Monty drops a few lines in his “half hour before lunch” because he’s got to go out about 30 kilometers and will be late getting back. “Speaking of rides, had a beautiful one on Wednesday…the route being along the Seine…just one picture after another. The weather has been great and this particular afternoon it was just right for automobile riding so enjoyed my outing all round.”

Along with this good weather and moonlight nights one expects the Bosche and he didn’t disappoint us. Wednesday night the alert sounded about 11 o’clock and the balcony outside our apartment was soon lined with pajama clad figures, rather a funny sight in the moonlight. The barrage was on for a while but it was soon finished and we had the “All clear” bugle. However, about three o’clock I was waked by a violent barrage which continued for about an hour. It seems to have been pretty effective for, from the official communiqué, only one Gotha out of forty got into the city and this did very little damage. Our crowd has been deliberating on visiting the official “abris” in the neighborhood during the next alert to see what kind of neighbors we have but so far the alerts have come about bedtime or after and we’ve been too lazy to dress and go down.

His French architect M. Veber is promising “le beautemps” tomorrow after a chilly day and he notes that dusk comes around “nine o’clock or after though that is partly due to the daylight saving hour. How are you liking it back home?”[2] He also notes that the French have some of the monuments “sandbagged against the air raids” including the Arc de Triomphe. “The French took care of their best loved monuments and relics first but they have most of them pretty well sandbagged now.”

Apartment life continues agreeable and guests “envy us both our apartment and our cuisine.” He seems ambivalent about his weight: “I’m already as heavy as I have ever been, having picked up about ten pounds since I came to France.” He thinks this will persist “if Eugenie, our cook, continues to feed us the way she is doing.” He reflects that cantaloupe season has arrived at home. “I surely would like to try some real Southern cooking again though, as aforesaid, I seem to be thriving on the French variety.”

[2] Congress first established Daylight Savings Time in 1918 presumably to support the war effort through energy savings. It was generally unpopular and was rescinded the following year.

 

Transcribed Letter:

c/o Q.M.U.S. Troops,

A.P.O.702, Am. E. F.

May 25, 1918

Dear Mother: –

Having a half hour before lunch thought I’d drop you a few lines as don’t expect to have the time tomorrow. This afternoon I’ve got to go out about 30 kilometers and will be fairly late getting back in. Speaking of rides had a beautiful one on Wednesday when I went out 50 kilometers most of the route being along the Seine. With everything green it was wonderfully beautiful, just one picture after another. The weather has been great and this particular afternoon it was just right for automobile riding so enjoyed my outing all round.

Along with this good weather and moonlight nights one expects the Bosche and he didn’t disappoint us. Wednesday night the alert sounded around 11 o’clock and the balcony outside our apartment was soon aligned with pajama clad figures, rather a funny sight in the moonlight. The barrage was on for a while but it was soon finished and we had the “All Clear” bugle. However, about 3 o’clock I was waked by a violent barrage which continued for about an hour. It seems to have been pretty effective for, from the official communiqué, only one Gotha out of 40 got into the city and this did very little damage. Our crowd has been deliberating on visiting the official “abris” in the neighborhood during the next alert to see what kind of neighbors we have but so far the alerts have come about bedtime or after and we’ve been too lazy to dress and go down.

After a week of excellent weather it has been a bit cool and cloudy yesterday and today but my friend, M. Veber, assures me that this is very temporary and we will have “le beautemps” again tomorrow. You know it isn’t dark these days until about 9 o’clock or after though of course that is partly due to the daylight saving hour. How are you liking it back home?

Noticed in the new “Colliers“ this week some pictures of how they have some of the monuments here sandbagged against the air raids. One of them was the Arch de Triomphe which I pass every day. The French took care of their best loved monuments and relics first but they have most of them pretty well sandbagged now.

Our apartment continues to go satisfactorily and all of the guests we have in seem to envy us both our apartment and our cuisine. I shall be picking up flesh if Eugenie, our cook, continues to feed us the way she is doing and I’m already as heavy as I’ve ever been, having picked up about 10 pounds since I came to France.

Met a medical officer last night named Allison from Yorkville who knew Bedford Moore and quite a few other people of my acquaintance back home. He told me incidentally that he understood Moore was coming over in Y.M.C.A. work or perhaps he may already be over here.

I guess it’s beginning to be pretty warm at home now and you’re commencing to have cantaloupes and such. Surely would like to get some real Southern cooking again though, as aforesaid, I seem to be thriving on the French variety.

No mail this week but understand a big one is due in today and so hope to find something from you Monday. My mail is getting through a good deal more regularly now and hope it so continues.

Love to all,

Carl

 

O.K. Thomas C. Montgomery [signature]

2nd Lt. Inf. R.C.

 

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