In a letter from New York dated September 2, 1917 he writes “this chase after equipment has been some tiresome job. With over 2,000 of us wanting stuff, the stores have run short and we’ve consequently had to chase all over the city…as well as to Governors and Bedloes Islands after Quartermaster equipment.” He needs his “second inoculation for para-typhoid” before he’ll be allowed on a transport ship. He’s anxious to go “for while it’s very pleasant staying in New York, it’s also very expensive.” He’s seen several law school friends during his hunt for essentials, “two of them being in this contingent going over.” Despite the expense, he’s developed a new sense of comfort with New York, which is “not the strange place it’s been heretofore” since “being in uniform makes a difference as everyone seems to be glad to tell you anything you want to know.”

 

Letter:

Sunday morning [September 2, 1917]

Dear Mother—

This is the first time since reaching here that I’ve really had time to sit down & write you without knowing there was something I ought to be doing. This chase after equipment has been some tiresome job. With over 2,000 of us wanting stuff, the stores have run short and we’ve consequently had to chase all over the city looking for different things, as well as to Governors & Bedloes[1] Islands after Quartermaster equipment. I still have a few things to get but will have to wait until Tuesday as tomorrow is Labor Day and all the stores will be closed. Tuesday I report back to Hoboken for my second inoculation for para-typhoid and then will find out get my transportation orders. None of us are being allowed to go on a transport until we’ve had this second inoculation. I know some of the men who’ve already completed their inoculations are to sail Wednesday and guess I’m likely to go then although one can’t tell. It may be Saturday before I get away. As soon as I’ve completed my equipment, which I expect to do Tuesday, I’ll be ready to go any time for, while it’s very pleasant staying in New York, it’s also very expensive.

Got my suit from Atlanta Tuesday but had to have a couple of alterations in it after all.

Spent one night this week out with Harry Hartwell up in Westchester and am to go back up with him again if here long enough. Have also seen several other of my old law school friends two of them being in this same contingent going over.

There are so many fellows here that I knew at Oglethorpe[2] that New York is not the strange place it’s been heretofore—one runs into some of these everywhere. Then being in uniform makes a difference as everyone seems to be glad to tell you anything you want to know.

Hope Kenley got all straightened out this week with Frank’s assistance and that you got out without losing any more than was apparent when I left home.

Will let you know as soon as I find out when I’ll go on board a transport.

Love to all,

Carl

[1] Renamed Liberty Island in 1956 to reflect occupancy by its major tenant the Statue of Liberty since 1886

[2] When Monty completed the Reserve Officers’ Training Camp at Fort Oglethorpe, he wasn’t alone. Subsequently, Special Orders No. 85, dated August 15, 1917, “called” forty-two officers who had just completed ROTC at Fort Oglethorpe “into active service and will report in person to the Commanding general, Port of Embarkation, Hoboken, New Jersey, on or before August 29, 1917.”

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