October 30, 1918. “I am now a 1st Lieutenant, Army Service Corp, continuing the same duties with the Renting, Requisitions and Claims Service.”

October 30, 1918 to Mother.

“…am snatching a few minutes now at one of the typewriters having come back to the office immediately after lunch.”

His big news is “that I am now a 1st Lieutenant.” He’s less than enthusiastic because “I was recommended for a Captaincy but lost out on it owing to the rule now existing that no one will be skipped a grade in making promotions. …so, I’m for the present wearing one silver bar instead of two as I’d been promised and expected.”

Work is complicated by the departure of one of his assistants whose replacement is expected any day. He says there’s “double work to do and not much ‘rest for the weary.’”

Even so, took all of last Sunday off and went hunting with my friend M. Veber, the architect of whom I’ve written you. Don’t be too horrified at my hunting on Sunday for it’s a regular custom over here—also of late I’ve been in most of my Sundays here in the office, Sunday office work being pretty necessary these days. Enjoyed the day very much and thought of Frank and how he would have liked it. Went down with M. Veber in his car to a club about forty miles south of Paris where they have a game preserve or “chasse” as it is called over here. There we had an excellent lunch and then started out with beaters, working through each piece of woods in turn. We had dogs along too but they are not allowed to range as when we hunt quail but are kept close in. There were a dozen of us at intervals of about 15 to 20 yards from each other and there wasn’t much chance for the pheasants or small deer when they got up. However, there weren’t so awfully many of them—I had only two shots all day both of which I missed. Some of the rest of the bunch had good shooting and we got enough game for each of us to bring home a little. It happened to be a beautiful October day and a whole day of that kind out of the office went awfully well.

“The war continues to look as if it could be finished very soon although the Bosche are not readily convinced. With the latest developments in Austria it looks, however, as if the whole thing is bound to go by the boards within a few weeks which we all hope.”

 

Transcribed letter:

AMERICAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCES [letterhead]

Headquarters, District of Paris

Oct. 30th,1918-A.P.O. 702

Dear Mother:-

Have received during the past week your letter of Oct. 5th and one from Kate of Oct. 9th but haven’t found time to answer either so am snatching a few minutes now at one of the typewriters having come back to the office immediately after lunch.

The main news with me since I last wrote you is that I am now a 1st Lieutenant, Army Service Corp, continuing the same duties with the Renting, Requisitions and Claims Service. Am not feeling as happy over the promotion as I would some time ago as I was recommended for a Captaincy but lost out on it owing to the rule now existing that no one will be skipped a grade in making promotions. Consequently have to be recommended again for the captaincy and it will probably take several months more to come through. Saw my Colonel yesterday and he told me would make recommendation again at once but, even so, I’m for the present wearing one silver bar instead of two as I’d been promised and expected.

Have continued to be horribly busy of late owing to the fact that I lost one of my assistants and his successor hasn’t yet arrived though he is due any day. As a consequence have had double work to do and not much “rest for the weary”. Even so, took all of last Sunday off and went hunting with my friend M. Veber, the architect of whom I’ve written you. Don’t be too horrified at my hunting on Sunday for it’s a regular custom over here—also of late I’ve been in most of my Sundays here in the office, Sunday office work being pretty necessary these days. Enjoyed the day very much and thought of Frank and how he would have liked it. Went down with M. Veber in his car to a club about forty miles south of Paris where they have a game preserve or “chasse” as it is called over here. There we had an excellent lunch and then started out with beaters, working through each piece of woods in turn. We had dogs along too but they are not allowed to range as when we hunt quail but are kept close in. There were a dozen of us at intervals of about 15 to 20 yards from each other and there wasn’t much chance for the pheasants or small deer when they got up. However, there weren’t so awfully many of them—I had only two shots all day both of which I missed. Some of the rest of the bunch had good shooting and we got enough game for each of us to bring home a little. It happened to be a beautiful October day and a whole day of that kind out of the office went awfully well.

The war continues to look as if it could be finished very soon although the Bosche are not readily convinced. With the latest developments in Austria it looks, however, as if the whole thing is bound to go by the boards within a few weeks which we all hope.

Enjoyed Kate’s letter and will drop her a line when I get time.

Love to all,

Carl

Thomas C Montgomery [signed]

1st Lt. A.S.C.