December 8, 1918. “There is continual excitement here these days—week before last it was King George, last week King Albert, next week Wilson, then the King of Italy and afterwards the Peace Conference.”

Sunday, December 8, 1918 to Mother.

Monty excuses his lapse in correspondence with this: “have been busy all day every day and out every evening this week. Now, since the armistice, there is something of a social nature every night; all of which is very pleasant but a little hard on a working man.”

“…Monroe Layton dropped in…. He was awfully glad to see somebody from home—said he was quite ready to go back any time and was hoping his regiment would be one of the early ones.

“Had a letter from Kate this week of Nov. 12th, my first home letter written since the armistice, and Kate seemed to believe it was a fake. Suppose she has changed her mind by now.

“There is continual excitement here these days—week before last it was King George[1], last week King Albert[2], next week Wilson, then the King of Italy and afterwards the Peace Conference. Our Headquarters has been charged with all of the army part of the preparation for the peace crowd and we’ve had of late a feverish not to say hectic time as a result. I’ve been as busy as a cat on a marble floor trying to find sufficient place for all the new people we have to look out for and, with all the other Allied Governments doing the same thing and the city crowded anyhow, it has been some job.

“Played bridge at the Embassy one night this week and had a chance to talk to Mr. Sharpe[3] for some little time. He remembered Mr. Ellerbe very well and also Mrs. Ellerbe and Edna. Had been there on thanksgiving afternoon at a reception for American Officers which was finished by an hour of very pleasant dancing. I’ve found the whole family there very pleasant but one is still a bit awed going in by the grandeur of the footmen, etc. This coming week I’ve already been asked to three dances which think will be quite enough for one week when one is busy during the day. However, one good thing about them is that they start and quit at a decent hour instead of trying to dance all night as we used to have the habit at home. Sorry John couldn’t have been here for some of this for know he would have enjoyed it thoroughly.

“Guess this letter will reach you just about Xmas in which case best wishes and lots of love to everybody,

 

[1] George V, King of England (reign, 1910-1936)

[2] Albert I, King of Belgium (reign, 1908-1934)

[3] William G. Sharp, Ambassador to France, 1914-1919.

 

Transcribed letter:

Hq; District of Paris

A.P.O. 702 A.E.F.

Dec. 8th, 1918

Dear Mother:-

Am ashamed to say I didn’t get off any letter to you last Sunday buy have been busy all day every day and out every evening this week. Now, since the armistice, there is something of a social nature every night; all of which is very pleasant but a little hard on a working man.

Was pleasantly surprised on Thursday Afternoon of this week when Horton Blew into my office on his way to Nice on leave. He stayed over until last night and we had quite a visit over what had happened since we last saw each other. Then also one day this week Monroe Layton dropped in to see me. It seems that he has been in Paris since July but didn’t know I was here until his mother wrote him where I was. He was awfully glad to see somebody from home—said he was quite ready to go back any time and was hoping his regiment would be one of the early ones.

Had a letter from Kate this week of Nov; 12th, my first home letter written since the armistice, and Kate seemed to believe it was a fake. Suppose she has changed her mind by now.

There is continual excitement here these days—week before last it was King George , last week King Albert , next week Wilson, then the King of Italy and afterwards the Peace Conference. Our Headquarters has been charged with all the Army part of the preparation for the peace crowd and we’ve had of late a feverish not to say hectic time as a result. I’ve been as busy as a cat on a marble floor trying to find sufficient place for all the new people we have to look out for and, with all the other Allied Governments doing the same thing and the city crowded anyhow, it has been some job.

Played bridge at the Embassy one night this week and had a chance to talk to Mr. Sharpe for some little time. He remembered Mr. Ellerbe very well and also Mrs. Ellerbe and Edna. Had been there on thanksgiving afternoon at a reception for American Officers which was finished by an hour of very pleasant dancing. I’ve found the whole family there very pleasant but one is still a bit awed going in by the grandeur of the footmen, etc. This coming week I’ve already been asked to three dances which think will be quite enough for one week when one is busy during the day. However, one good thing about them is that they start and quit at a decent hour instead of trying to dance all night as we used to have the habit at home. Sorry John couldn’t have been here for some of this for know he would have enjoyed it thoroughly.

Guess this letter will reach you just about Xmas in which case best wishes and lots of love to everybody,

Carl

Thomas C Montgomery [signed] Capt, A.S.C.

July 1, 1918. “He was most pleasant and I enjoyed the experience of meeting and riding with such a big bug”

July 1, 1918 to Mother. Monty reports a number of “home letters” and clippings received recently.  He hopes brother Kenly will “write more about what the Liberty motor[1]is doing as I haven’t been able to get much definite dope on that over here, and we are all naturally very much interested in the progress made on it.”

Promotions seem to be on his mind as friends and acquaintances are getting theirs: “Horton has got his Captaincy and also Hertz Brown.” He comments that “Promotions seem to be much more easy at home than with the A.E.F.” Nevertheless, “if things continue to break well for the next month or two, I am told by my chief there may be something doing.”

The weather has improved. “Along with the warm weather and moonlight nights we’ve also had the Gothas with us again.  They came down three nights last week and the alert was sounded again last night but they didn’t get to town that time.”

Had an interesting and pleasant experience yesterday afternoon.  Was having tea at this Country Club to which I go when possible with some French friends when we were joined by the British Ambassador, Lord Derby, whom they know well and I came back with him and them in his car.  He was most pleasant and I enjoyed the experience of riding with such a big bug—have found all the English I’ve met on this side an awfully good sort anyhow and want to see more of England some time if possible.

“Hope everything is going well with you at home….”

[1]Considered an important technological contribution to the war effort, it was a lightweight, mass produced engine that powered the DH4. More.

 

Letter verbatim:

A.P.O. 702, A.E.F.

July 1, 1918

Dear Mother: –

Had several home letters last week, yours of May 31stand one from Frank of June 4thtogether with two or three others of yours the dates of which I don’t know as I haven’t them with me at the moment. Enjoyed the enclosed letters of Judge Woods, John and Lee as well as the clippings. Suppose from Kenly‘s letter that he is probably at home by this time on the leave he was expecting to get. Wish he would write me more about what the Liberty motor is doing as I haven’t been able to get much definite dope on that over here, and we are all naturally very much interested in the progress made with it.

Was pleasantly surprised Saturday afternoon when Bert France called me up. He is in town for two or three days on his way back to the States as an instructor and perhaps he’ll see some of you if he gets any leave in South Carolina. If so he can give you a better idea I suppose of how things are going over here then any letters I might write. He is still in town and expect to see him again tonight. He told me something I didn’t know – that Horton has got his Captaincy and also Hertz Brown. He also said that he had had a letter from Spartanburg saying that I had the same thing but no such good luck as yet; his correspondent was quite mistaken about it though, if things continue to break well for the next month or two, I am told by my chief there may be something doing. However, I shan’t believe anything of that kind until I see it. Promotions seem to be much more easy at home then with the A.E.F.

Along that line noticed from one of your clippings that both Monroe and Dick Johnson had gone up a grade. Didn’t know it before though Dick told me at Xmas that that would probably occur in the next few months.

Am glad to say the weather has gone back to summertime within the past week and it is now reasonably warm again. Along with the warm weather and moonlight nights we’ve also had the Gothas with us again. They came down three nights last week and the alert was sounded again last night but they didn’t get to town that time.

Had an interesting and pleasant experience yesterday afternoon. Was having tea at this Country Club to which I go when possible with some French friends when we were joined by the British ambassador, Lord Derby, whom they know well and I came back with them and him in his car. He was most pleasant and I enjoyed the experience of meeting and riding with such a big bug – have found all the English I’ve met on this side an awfully good sort anyhow and want to see more of England sometime if possible.

Hope everything is going well with you at home,

Love to all, Carl

 

Thomas C. Montgomery

2ndLt. Inf. R.C.